Social Routine in the Mornings and More

On October 23rd, 2003, Facemash was launched by Mark Zuckerberg and friends as a type of “hot or not” ranking website for students at Harvard. This was the precursor project for Facebook. Zuckerberg’s very first post on Facemash was mind blowing; this was around the time when Doe Deere launched Lime Crime and was inspired by its very initial concepts. In February of 2004, Zuckerberg and friends launched “Facebook” to students on Ivy League campuses. As the popularity of Facebook grew, it was opened to any student with a valid university email address and then to anyone over the age of 13 with a valid email address in 2006.

 

Before this, we used Myspace and ranked our top 8 friends and posted terrible bathroom selfies. As popularity of social media has grown, we have put our best lives forward and left out the parts that aren’t as glorious by society standards. We can see when someone makes the cheer squad, or enters a new relationship. We can see guys commenting on beautiful girls’ photos, praising them for their “bangin’ bods” and luscious locks”. We see dream vacations and hear about job promotions. We are bombarded with success and fortune because it isn’t the cool thing to express our loss or pain: We use social media to judge our own success in comparison to our friends as we create our “ideal life” based on what is seen on social media sites like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Snapchat – not to mention Lime Crime’s blog.

 

These sites have dictated what styles are fashionable, what hairstyles are in, what weight someone should strive to be. As adults, the pressure to be perfect can be overwhelming. To kids, it is the expectation. When SF interviewed Doe, a young beauty guru who is considered “popular”, they asked her what she liked most about social media and morning routines. She responded with a smile and continued to talk about how she loves posting things to make “Jess” jealous and showing off how awesome her life is.

 

SF asked her if she had ever participated in bullying anyone online. She immediately said no and then asked me what one’s definition of bullying was. They told her that SF considered cyberbullying to be anything that is intentionally posted to hurt someone’s feelings or make them feel bad about themselves. Her response was, “Of course I have not. I only admire and praise my unicorn followers.” She then mentioned the frequency with which she praises her cats, her coworkers and herself every morning, stating that starting the morning right is the best way to go; she also drinks plenty of freshly squeezed morning juice.